Re: [CR]cottered cranks question


From: "Diane Feldman" <feldmanbike@home.com>
To: <bob.reid1@virgin.net>, "Mark A. Perkins" <bicyclemark@juno.com>
Cc: <Classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
References: <20010210.121735.-436725.3.bicyclemark@juno.com>
Subject: Re: [CR]cottered cranks question
Date: Sat, 10 Feb 2001 12:49:00 -0800


During the time when cotters were more commonI was warned to avoid ever hammering a cotter lest the impact brinnel the bb cups or spindle. Also, the big Var press seemed to knock the threaded end off the pin more often than not and--again, more often than not--the Park-made tool was just right! David "no connection to Park Tool Co." Feldman


----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark A. Perkins"
To:
Cc:
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2001 12:17 PM
Subject: Re: [CR]cottered cranks question



> In all of the responses with advise on how to remove and install crank
> cotters, I did not see one mention of the use of either grease or
> never-sieze compound on both the threads and the whole pin. As I have
> mentioned before, I have spent at least 12 years of my adult life working
> in bicycle shops as a full-time mechanic/sales person. I personally own
> over 80 books on the subject of the bicycle. Over the years, I learned
> (from both experience and my reading), that a little bit of grease
> applied to the pin, washer, and threads, will both, help prevent damage
> to the threads, and aid in pulling the pin through as far as it will go.
> This has always worked for me, and as far as I know none have ever come
> loose on their own. Also, how one files the taper can make a major
> difference in how the pin seats, and stays seated. Care must be taken to
> be sure that the surface is perfectly flat, or the pin will not seat
> properly. And keeping the arms in line with each other can be helped by
> starting out with a fairly well matched pair of new cotters, and taking
> care to do any necessary filing, the same on both pins.
>
> "Bicycle Mark" Perkins
> (happily, & newly employed by T-Squared Architects, Fresno, CA)
>
> On Fri, 09 Feb 2001 08:35:51 +0000 Bob Reid <bob.reid1@virgin.net>
> writes:
> > I have to ask if it's really necessarry to install the cotter pin with
> a
> > tool in the first place ? - My father taught me fairly early on that
> using
> > any kind of tool (or hammer for that matter) to seat a cotter pin on
> the
> > crank meant that it was going to be all the harder and more difficult
> to
> > remove it the next time. He seemed to an age with engineers marking
> fluid
> > ("blue") and a fine file, getting a "better" fit on a new cotter pin so
> it
> > was well seated on the axle, rather than just taking a big hammer to
> the
> > back of it and making it fit. This was perhaps taking it a little too
> far
> > but I suppose he had a point, and I don't recall his cranks ever
> loosening
> > off, and the better fit onto the surface of the axle flat ought to
> reduce
> > the risk of slippage / movement under load. Other than that you should
> get
> > it tight enough using the nut supplied.
> >
> > Best Regards
> >
> > Bob (cotterless ? - It'll never catch on) Reid
> > Stonehaven
> > Scotland
> >
> >
> > > From: "Aldo Ross" <swampmtn@siscom.net>
> > > Date: Thu, 8 Feb 2001 12:53:43 -0500
> > > To: <Classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
> > > Subject: [CR]cottered cranks question
> > >
> > > I finally bought a Park cotter pin press for all my my bikes with
> Magistroni
> > > cranksets! I've read Sheldon Brown's excellent articles about
> removal and
> > > installation of cotter pins, but I still have one question: How tight
> should I
> > > press in the cotter pin? Is it possible to exert TOO MUCH pressure
> with the
> > > Park tool?
> > >
> > > Thanks for any information.
> > >
> > > Aldo Ross