Re: [CR]A few words about chrome plating


Example: Framebuilders:Dario Pegoretti

From: "Diane Feldman" <feldmanbike@home.com>
To: <rocklube@adnc.com>
Cc: <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
References: <3B02284C.73F@adnc.com> <008c01c0de7b$50a04bc0$1c29b018@vncvr1.wa.home.com> <3B033F72.3239@adnc.com>
Subject: Re: [CR]A few words about chrome plating
Date: Wed, 16 May 2001 20:48:06 -0700


Ah, yeah I guess I was asking if there was any benefit in a nickel and/or a copper layer under the chrome in terms of durability, or corrosion resistance, or lessening any weakening of the steel.

DF


----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Baylis"
To: "Diane Feldman"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 8:03 PM
Subject: Re: [CR]A few words about chrome plating



> Dave, I'm not sure what you're asking. Please clarify.
>
> Brian Baylis
> >
> > What about a nickel layer under the chrome? I remember Ten Speed Drive
> > making a big deal about the multi-layer copper, nickel, and chrome on their
> > frames in the 1980;'s. At least on the top of the line Ciocc and Tomasso
> > frames, the plating looked great, but how did it last and did the nickel
> > have anything to do with it?
> >
> > David Feldman
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Brian Baylis" <rocklube@adnc.com>
> > To: <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
> > Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 12:12 AM
> > Subject: [CR]A few words about chrome plating
> >
> > > Listmembers,
> > >
> > > There are a few key points regarding chrome plating that weren't
> > > completely addressed, which I'd like to illuminate since the topic came
> > > up.
> > >
> > > First, it is of prime importance to have a very good relationship with
> > > ones' plater if one expects excellent results while avoiding the
> > > pitfalls that can (but do not neccessarily have to) accompany a chrome
> > > plating job. The problem of drainage is easily solved by one of two
> > > methods. The best one is not to have any holes in the seat stays or fork
> > > blades in the first place. The only safe way to accomplish this is
> > > during the framebuilding process; filling the one vent hole in the fork
> > > or stay just after brazing the final joint that encloses the tube while
> > > it is still hot. Trying to fill a hole afterwards is risky and is a
> > > pretty good way to insure that a small pinhole will allow plating
> > > solution to enter and have no way to escape. So for resorations it is
> > > best to make sure each stay and blade hace two holes at opposite ends
> > > that are about 3/32" in diameter. Any GOOD plater can work with that and
> > > give the owner of the frame the ability to introduce a rust inhibitor
> > > AFTER the paint job is applied.
> > >
> > > Regarding polishing. Yes it is dangerous, providing the plater (which
> > > includes all but the one I use) goes about it with the polishing lathes
> > > that Jim described. The exceptional plater will have developed a
> > > "secret" method to accomplish this task without risk to frame or human
> > > body. As luck would have it, the polisher at my plater is a good friend
> > > of mine (we have an interest in drums and drumming in common) and has
> > > passed this trick on to me; which I can use myself if I'm so inclined
> > > (which usually I'm not). But, it is quite safe and only requires some
> > > time and effort to accomplish, along with a few special tools and
> > > whatnot.
> > >
> > > Only a really careless or inexperienced plater can accomplish hydrogen
> > > embrittlement on a frame. It's not easy to do. As far as I know, only
> > > about a half an hour at 300 or so degrees is required to disipate the
> > > effect. Maybe industrial (or "hard" chrome) requires 12 to 24 hours at
> > > temp., but not decorative chrome like we use. Modern nickel formulations
> > > take the place of the old "triple chrome" process and work perfectly
> > > well. Like Jim said, copper is for heavily pitted parts these days. If a
> > > frame is that bad off, it's probably best not to chrome (or maybe even
> > > ride) it at that point.
> > >
> > > The chrome I get from my plater is mirrorlike; it's all in the polishing
> > > and keeping clean tanks.
> > >
> > > As far as a completely chrome frame goes, OUCH! Costs a bit of money for
> > > a good plater to do it; so there's no point in doubling it by sending it
> > > to someone else to hand to a plater. Find you own guy and save the money
> > > for a payment on your Ferarri, like Joe said. Good luck.
> > >
> > > Brian Baylis