Re: [CR]Cinelli's are rough? - Who is making "rough" bikes these days?


To: heine@mindspring.com
Date: Sat, 8 Mar 2003 10:03:31 -0500
Subject: Re: [CR]Cinelli's are rough? - Who is making "rough" bikes these days?
From: Richard M Sachs <richardsachs@juno.com>
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

Jan Heine asked, snipped from below: "Which brings me to my question: Who beyond Singer is making "rough" frames today. By that I mean hand-carved lugs, or even better, not-investment cast lugs, etc."

jan many, many people can fill this request. as asked before, "Where are the customers?" e-RICHIE chester, ct

On Sat, 8 Mar 2003 05:52:52 -0800 Jan Heine <heine@mindspring.com> writes:
> Brian,
>
> Well said. Comparing my two daily riders, a Rivendell and a Singer,
>
> the difference is obvious. Yes, the Singer is unbelievably clean - a
>
> truly great brazing job. All lugs are totally symmetrical, because
> they were cast that way.
>
> Then take the Singer: A few of the lugs aren't quite perfectly
> symmetrical. The difference is slight, but it is obvious that
> somebody carved these out of a blank, or maybe even made the lug
> from
> two pieces of tubing welded together. Then built them up to a nice
> radius. Most of the work was done where modern builders start. The
> bike speaks to me because I know Roland Csuka (whom I unfortunately
>
> never met) did this. Of course, the Singer is much cleaner than some
>
> Cinellis, but the evidence of handwork remains.
>
> Maybe it is like comparing a photography to a painting - the photo
> always will be sharper, crisper, yet worth less in many cases.
>
> Which brings me to my question: Who beyond Singer is making "rough"
>
> frames today. By that I mean hand-carved lugs, or even better,
> not-investment cast lugs, etc.
>
> And Brian, what is your take on fillet-brazing?
>
> Jan Heine, Seattle