Re: [CR]Cleats?

(Example: Framebuilding)

To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 09:05:58 -0800
Subject: Re: [CR]Cleats?
From: Mark A. Perkins <bicyclemark@juno.com>


Hello Bike friends:

I always attached my cleats myself. Eventually, a family member gave me what I will call an antique, cast-iron, cobbler's anvil, for lack of knowledge of the correct name. It bolts to the work bench, stands about 16" tall, and has several sizes of contoured, shoe sole shaped, anvils (?) which fit on the top. I also like to use an electric drill to pre-drill the nail holes (more of a smaller pilot hole), particularly where there's a steel shank or any material other than leather involved, but I drill the leather too. The anvil thingie helps bend the tip of the nail on the inside (insole removed of course), which keeps the nails from coming out. Another tip is to just use a minimal number of nails at first, and once you are sure the cleat is in the correct position add the remaining nails, or screws if you like.

For Campagnolo NR/SR road or track pedals, I believe it was Cinelli that came out with a block of black plastic that fit the contour of the cast pedal body and the space confined by the cage and pedal body. I liked these on the track, but they made it a bit more difficult to pull a foot out of the pedal. They really felt like my feet were firmly connected to the pedals. Unlike when I used two straps per pedal, to keep my shoe from rocking and tapping on the front cage plate, when I was using regular TA slotted cleats.

I used the Barelli cleats for awhile, the style I used had a taller rear plate which helped you find the pedal cage faster. The taller plate would be harder to walk on, and would eventually wear down. They also fit the Barelli pedals better.

While I'm on the retro shoe thing, I have a pair of Maressi, lace up, black leather, cycling shoes, with some Italian colored plastic, for decoration. They have adjustable cleats, with three screws to keep them tight, and nail holes around their perimeter in case you want to make them permanently attached. The screws seem to keep them in place just fine though. However these shoes just kill my feet in the arch area on both sides of both feet. They seem to have more pronounced arch supports, and also seem to be for narrower feet. The combination just isn't made for my feet. I finally decided never to ride with them again, because I always end up regretting it.

But for my Adidas (Eddy Merckx?) shoes with the contoured plastic (probably composite) sole, I like the TA "Calrouge" cleats, made of red plastic with metal cleat edges molded in. Does anyone know where I can find a few pair of these?

Just a few more cents worth from my past experience.

"Bicycle Mark" Perkins Fresno Cycling Club - Historian Fresno, California, U.S.A.

P.S.: I don't want to rub it in, but since so many of you include your local weather conditions, here's what today's forecast said: Sunny with a high of 74 degrees F. I think they said breezy too, but it seems pretty calm right now. The hills are green, and the wildflowers are beginning to bloom, the orchards are in bloom. Time to go for a ride wouldn't you think?

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