Re: [CR]Lacquer for Bikes


From: David Hallam <zzdhalla@ozemail.com.au>
Organization: mechanicus_equus
To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
Subject: Re: [CR]Lacquer for Bikes
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 21:40:17 +1100
References: <fb.3a6871d8.2b9fefa5@aol.com> <002701c2e8e4$f6727940$7ce6fea9@LEONARDO> <00b301c2e8e7$3a390520$57b21b18@cinci.rr.com>
In-Reply-To: <00b301c2e8e7$3a390520$57b21b18@cinci.rr.com>


Surely it depends if you are talking about enamels or baked enamels. People tend to be loose with terminology and much is lost in the many differing interpretations in different countries. Also the material to which these "rules" are applied changes with time. Anything that is crosslinked in-situe will be harder to remove or affect by solvents. Some solvents will swell even the "best" epoxybased paint and will certainly swell solvent drying base coats. Laquer over enamel sounds more feasible but... as thinners changed this would have proved wrong for some materials. Clear as mud? /dlh -- David Hallam in Queanbeyan Australia on linux -- A Volvo, Daimler, BMW, Motobecane, Suntour and Zeus nut. email contacts; -zzdhalla@ozemail.com.au "Powered by Debian GNU/Linux 2.7 by Libranet" Thank goodness we don't have M$ bicycles!

On Thu, 13 Mar 2003 09:32 am, Steve Neago wrote:
> Hi David,
>
> I thought it was the other way around, but I could be wrong... I recall
> that lacquer was not as durable as enamel and was not a good choice for a
> base or clear coat coat.. Maybe enamel reducers came into play in the late
> 70's early 80s which is out of the time frame I refer to in the late 60s to
> mid 70s...
>
> Can anyone add to this discussion and correct me if David or I are wrong ?
>
> Regards, Steve Neago
> Cincinnati, OH
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "David Goerndt" <davidg@iag.net>
> To: "Steve Neago" <questor@cinci.rr.com>; <LouDeeter@aol.com>;
> <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2003 5:15 PM
> Subject: Re: [CR]Lacquer for Bikes
>
> > : [CR]Lacquer for Bikes
> >
> > I believe the general rule at that time
> >
> > > was
> > > that you could apply lacquer over enamel but not enamel over lacquer.
> >
> > This
> >
> > > "rule of thumb" has changed over time as the paint materials have been
> > > modified by the manufacturers.
> >
> > I always thought it was the other way. Lacquer/Acrylic Lacquer will cause
> > enamel to "alligator".
> > enamel over lacquer was ok, because enamel reducers didn't affect
> > lacquer.
> >
> > David Goerndt
> > Orlando, FL