Re: [CR]Some craftsman don't quit working, but they do die


To: mail@woodworkingboy.com
Date: Mon, 9 Jun 2003 11:33:34 -0400
Subject: Re: [CR]Some craftsman don't quit working, but they do die
From: Richard M Sachs <richardsachs@juno.com>
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

dennis. coooooooooool story. 'reminds me of some text (from a New Yorker article) deb and i put with our wedding invitations:

"Then the company fell silent and watched him staring intently at the painting, sensing what was going through his mind, that at his age every painting could be the last, and that he had in fact during lunch mentioned a Japanese wise man, Makino, who at the age of 96 was writing a book on vegetables, which he deliberately left unfinished, as a way of staying alive."

e-RICHIE Richard Sachs Cycles No.9, North Main Street Chester, CT 06412 USA Tel. 860.526.2059 http://www.richardsachs.com http://photos.yahoo.com/bobbesrs

Dennis Young <mail@woodworkingboy.com> writes: A little story, somewhat off topic, but I hope for allowances. Some years ago, I was back in Japan for a brief visit. I knew that my former woodworking teacher was getting up there in years, and as he had been in poor health during my last trip (I had visited him every three or four years since completing my apprenticeship), I had hoped to see him at least a final time. Unfortunately, I didn't make it soon enough, and missed his passing by a few weeks. His daughter told me that during his last few months, when he was completely bedridden, he would often be going through the motions of making furniture with his hands, cutting and planing wood while in a semi conscious state. Mr. Nakamiche began his career at the age of thirteen, and died in his late 80s. In his mind it seems, he continued his work up to the very end.

Dennis Young
Hotaka, Japan