Re: [CR]So, you want to see some VR 3 photos?


Example: Racing:Wayne Stetina

Date: Tue, 07 Oct 2003 20:08:02 -0700
From: brian baylis <rocklube@adnc.com>
To: "Thomas R. Adams, Jr." <kctommy@msn.com>, classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
Subject: Re: [CR]So, you want to see some VR 3 photos?
References: <BAY4-F12kWHulizm1N800016336@hotmail.com>


Tom,

Interesting questions you ask. Briefly, the answers in my opinion are that there are some "rules" but the true artist can visualize some things that make the whole process a creative adventure that hopefully involves the customer as well. Generally I find the process to be me extracting some information about what the customer wants and then I make suggestions based on my experinece to get the end results. Much of what it ends up looking like also depends on how skillfully the paint is applied. In fact, many factors are involved in creating the "best" paint job for a given bike.

Cinelli Silver is probably the color that accentuates super fine and thin lugwork the best. There are lots of other choices for all kinds of situations. The art and skill of bike painting is a great thing, and can easily make or break the effect that the builder intended. In total your question would take volumes to answer completely. Suffice it to say that we could probably discuss painting forever.

It is neccessary to say that the durability of the paint job is MORE important than the way it looks, from a technical standpoint. The paint is serving a purpose, and if it ain't on the frame it isn't any good. Bikes can get scratched easily and are exposed to the elements as well. When something happens the damage should be minimal if the paint is properly applied. If parts get clamped on the frame there should be no deforming of the clear nor tearing of the paint away from the primer or base coat. Smooth, deep, and thin are the hallmarks of a first class paint job. The trained eye can tell the difference once they have seen it in person and up close. We did some of this during the framebuilding seminar this past Friday .

Hope that begins to answer your questions.

Brian Baylis La Mesa, CA Got anything tougher to answer? Holy Moley.

"Thomas R. Adams, Jr." wrote:
> Thanks for the insights Brian. The Scot in question has tastefully restrained ornamental lugwork and the paint scheme makes it easy to see the work. I'm wondering if there are any "rules" for selecting colors and paint schemes for different types of lugs or for different effects. For example what is the best color scheme to show off intricate lug work? Light color? Dark? Metallic? Pearl? contrasting head tube? Lugs in a contrasting color? Lug outlining? Or a combination of all the above?
>
> Then, do the "rules" change for classic long point lugs? If you're strapped for cash and are getting a single color respray without panels and masking, how do different colors affect the perception of the lug work?
>
> Or does it all depend on the perceptions of the looker, and what one person calls a good paint job to show off lugs another will condemn as hiding the bike's beauty?
>
> Naturally everyone has an opinion, but do the painters have any rules of thumb on what color schemes work better in certain situations?
>
> Tom Adams, Shrewsbury NJ
>
> >From: brian baylis
>
> >To: "Thomas R. Adams, Jr."
> ,classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
>
> >Subject: Re: [CR]So, you want to see some VR 3 photos?
>
> >Date: Tue, 07 Oct 2003 09:18:10 -0700
>
> >
>
> >Tom,
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> >
>
> >Funny story about that paint job. I was inspired to do that combination when I saw a photo on Bob Reids' website. He had highlighted some of the
>
> >features of a Scot frame that was red. He muted the color of the tubes to a pinkish color. I thought it was an original paint scheme and told
>
> >Bob that I wanted to do mine that way. He told me about the modification of the photo; but I decided to do it anyway.
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> >
>
> >BTW, around here that color is what I call a "true" Salmon color. It is basically pink but then yellow is added until I get the shade of salmon
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> >I'm looking for. I made the red first and tinted with yellow towards a slightly orange-red color. The gold decals and pinstriping tied
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> >everything together. Result, Bob Reid please take note, 1st place for "Best Paint" at VRIII.
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> >
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> >Sometimes it's odd where my inspiration comes from for a paint job; but that's what makes it fun.
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> >
>
> >Brian Baylis
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> >La Mesa, CA
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> >
>
> >"Thomas R. Adams, Jr." wrote:
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> >
>
> > > Thanks to all for the reports and pics. But I do have to ask, Bob, how many Flying Scots left the factory with a California Pink paint job?
>
> > >
>
> > > Tom Adams, Shrewsbury NJ
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> > >
>
> > > >From: "Tom"
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> > >
>
> > > >Reply-To: Tom
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> > >
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> > > >To:
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> > >
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> > > >Subject: [CR]So, you want to see some VR 3 photos?
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> > >
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> > > >Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2003 18:46:57 -0700
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> > >
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> > > >
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> > >
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> > > >
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> > >
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> > > >Here are some photos from the weekend to whet your appetite.
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> > >
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> > > >They're meant to supplement Dale's on the CR pages. I had a great time,
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> > >
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> > > >and
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> > >
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> > > >enjoyed meeting all of you.
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> > >
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> > > >
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> > >
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> > > >http://members4.clubphoto.com/tom313673/1667584/guest.phtml
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> > >
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> > > >
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> > >
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> > > >Tom Truong
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> > >
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> > > >Dublin, Ca