RE: [CR]Re: Japanese Bikes


Example: Framebuilders:Jack Taylor

From: "Rod Kronenberg" <rodk3d@attbi.com>
To: <ABikie@aol.com>, <dnovo@ix.netcom.com>, <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
Subject: RE: [CR]Re: Japanese Bikes
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 07:14:39 -0700
In-Reply-To: <6b.ce8cd6a.2bab22fa@aol.com>


Another fine example of Japanese quality is a Zunow, which is on e-bay now at: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3600065929&category=2 2681

What a beautiful frameset! Too bad it's so "small"!

Rod Kronenberg Fort Collins (32" of snow yesterday!),

CO

-----Original Message----- From: classicrendezvous-bounces@bikelist.org [mailto:classicrendezvous-bounces@bikelist.org] On Behalf Of ABikie@aol.com Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2003 6:58 AM To: dnovo@ix.netcom.com; classicrendezvous@bikelist.org Subject: Re: [CR]Re: Japanese Bikes

In a message dated 3/20/2003 8:46:10 AM Eastern Standard Time, dnovo@ix.netcom.com writes:
>
>
>
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> The idea that there are few, if any, 'classic' Japanese bikes from the time
> period covered by our group is simply wrong. We are, perhaps, to wrapped
> up in the world view that if it didn't come with Campy, Stronglight, TA,
> etc and was not built from Italian, British or French tubing and assembled
> there (or perhaps here in the US from those components such as a Masi) it
> is simply not a 'classic.'
>
> One of the finest bikes I ever owned, and would love to find once again
> today, was a mid to late 70s Nishiki Competition. SunTour components, fine
> Japanese tubing, and superlative build quality. The ride and response was
> matchless for it time, and the Sun Tour bar ends were easily the finest
> system, coupled with what I recall was a VGT or VGLuxe that could be had in
> what was then a contemporary bike. I recall my dealer had the PX available
> in my size as well, but a back to back left the French rival in the dust,
> and I left with a blue Nisihiki that day that was to remain my principal
> ride even when it was later burdened with a child seat to haul my son as a
> toddler to go for a ride with his 'Daddy'. (That toddler is now 23, and
> sometimes hangs back so as not to drop his elderly Dad too badly when he
> comes up from his condo in the city to go for a spin with his Pop.)
>
> The Nisihki and many other Japanese bikes of the period, and their
> components, were true classics IMHO. I am only sorry my bike was destroyed
> in one of our moves about 15 years ago or I would still be riding one
> today.
>
> Anyone have one for sale in a smaller size? Love to rekindle that love
> affair.
>
> Dave Novoselsky,
> Chicago, Illinois
>

Dave and other aficionados. I agree that there seems to be more poo-poo'ing of the Japanese machines of our era. I'll keep my eyes open in the next clean-up for a Nishiki Comp. I might even have one of their O.N.P. Pro models in the Champagne color with clean, tapered long point lugs and a full sloping crown. I would have had an extra one but in haste I returned it because the bottle eyes were placed on the seat tube instred of the downtube. I was supposed to get the corrected one but it never came. I can assuyme that there were bikes that never got exported to us from Japan that might have been even more elegant and interesting.

Larry Black
Mt Airy, Maryland.