[CR]Re: Roly-Poly tyres, Mojo, Enlightenment


Example: Production Builders:LeJeune

Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 16:05:59 -0800
From: David Faulkner <dfaulkne@arb.ca.gov>
Organization: California Air Resources Board
To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
References: <CATFOOD62EJjyKWZROi00000329@catfood.nt.phred.org>
Subject: [CR]Re: Roly-Poly tyres, Mojo, Enlightenment

Jon Scheer wrote:


>
>
> I am another huge fan of the Veloflex tires, but at 180lbs the sizes are on
> the lite side for me (though zero durability problems after a full season
> last year), and even the 22's just don't seem to look right on the older
> bikes. The standard, non-TT Vittoria Corsa CX is another good one, and a
> little larger in volume. I've been meaning to sample the newest top-model
> Gommitalia clincher. I liked the Platinum sew-up. The Panaracer category 1's
> looked very good as classic tires, and were decent and round in profile. A
> grade down were the Avocet K20 roads and even the Tioga Proline F.
>

Rivendell's Roly-Poly tire has black tread and tan sidewalls. It's available from Rivendell. Rivendell claims that they're the roundest tires available. I've been riding on a pair since September 2002, and they're nice tires. At 700 X 28, some might think they're too "big", but they work well and handle nicely on my bike. They get my recommendation for those who aren't riding sew-ups and who aren't embarassed to ride 28's. As for mojo, juju etc. I can only say that the Harley folks sum it up well with "If I have to explain, you wouldn't understand." We can share our interest in old bikes .. uh sorry, classic bikes, and our knowledge (and our stuff), but we can't actually define what makes them so great for us. It's wonderful that so many with highly developed densibilities are willing to share their appreciation of what's great for them in old bikes and bike gear. When folks like e-Richie and Brian Baylis open up, it contradicts the old wisdom that "Those who know do not speak." Or is there someone else out there who's keeping silent . . .

David Faulkner in Sacramento, where the cottonwoods are threatening to come into "bloom."