Re: [CR]frame size, Rivendell position, and large feet


Example: Racing

Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 14:25:59 -0800 (PST)
From: joe starck <joestarck2003@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [CR]frame size, Rivendell position, and large feet
To: Louis Schulman <louiss@gate.net>
In-Reply-To: <E18yf5s-0001ls-00@smtp10.atl.mindspring.net>
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

Louis- Have you tried stem angle, as in more rise, coupled with a smaller frame, and consequently, more straddle clearance, which you wish you had. Or don't you like that look? Joe Starck, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin Louis Schulman <louiss@gate.net> wrote: Reading through all the different threads on these topics, it is interesting how they interrelate.

For example, I have also been moving my handlebars closer to the level of my saddle, both by the larger frame technique, as well as the longer steerer/longer stem technique.

For me, the larger frame technique has limits. Because I have proportionately long feet, I have the saddle up considerably higher than most people with my leg length. As a consequence, however, I have proportionately less straddle clearance. Thus, I could not even straddle a frame large enough to put the saddle level with the bars using a normal steerer and stem.

But there are all kinds of ways to make compromises on position. One example, is the leave the bars a little lower, and use a steeper seat angle. This tips you forward a bit, and puts a little more weight on your hands. But it also takes some weight off your posterior.

I think the best thing is to have different bikes set up with different positions. This lets you rest different spots on different days, and therefore you can ride even more!

Louis Schulman Tampa, Florida (where summer has arrived a little early this year)

On Thu, 27 Mar 2003 11:40:29 -0500, Richard M Sachs wrote:

#BobHoveyGa@aol.com writes: #"Is it such a good idea to use a person's height as the basis of seat #tube #length, since we are really talking about leg length here? After all, #everyone's proportions are different." # #a person's foot length is a critical dimension to consider in determining #frame size and saddle height. any formula or chart that overlooks this #measurement is incomplete. #a person's height is not relevant when choosing a frame size. #e-RICHIE #chester, ct #_______________________________________________ #Classicrendezvous mailing list #Classicrendezvous@bikelist.org #http://www.bikelist.org/mailman/listinfo/classicrendezvous