[CR]Paraffin (Kerosene) as a cleaner...


Example: Events:Cirque du Cyclisme:2007

Date: Tue, 20 Apr 2004 07:35:26 +0100
To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
References: <BAY1-F7iGEDZkQ5XvJb0004bab3@hotmail.com>
From: Bob Reid <robertrreid@tiscali.co.uk>
In-Reply-To:
Subject: [CR]Paraffin (Kerosene) as a cleaner...

Sam wrote ;

Ever tried stuffing candlewax into a primus stove ? Try Kerosene it works better - honest !

BTW "SINGER" opened their first European factory (thanks to an ex-pat Scot on the US payroll)in Clydebank SCOTLAND in 1867? probably once the largest single employer in Scotland - or at least one of them - right next to the biggest British shipyards, on an Industrial scale of the like of Raleigh complete with it's own town and railway (railroad :-) station, called emmmm ? Singer. (SING-ERR not SAN-JER)

No doubt highly frowned upon these days by the safety experts Paraffin proverbially stinks but there's little to beat it for cleaning down old bike parts, especially chains...

Bob Reid Stonehaven Scotland

On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 03:11:50 +0000, sam Lingo <samclingo@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> Raleigh recomends using their oil.New Departure says to use SAE-20
> engine oil.The "Big Book of Hubs" says don't use "all
> purpose"(3-in-one)(WD40) and not to over oil and let the oil run down on
> the tyres/raleigh also says not to get oil on tyres.Raleigh says you can
> clean freewheels with paraffin.Paraffin is candle wax to me--any idea
> what Paraffin means in the Queen's English?
>
> And BTW Raleigh/T.I. had a lot of chemists and scientists on the
> pay-roll. They may not have refined the oil,but they very well tested
> oil for their needs.
>
> I use Singer sewing machine oil--singers were also a product of england
> so I'm close at least
>
> sam lingo pleasanton tx
>
>
>
>
>
>> From: "kohl57@starpower.net" <kohl57@starpower.net>
>
>> Reply-To: kohl57@starpower.net
>
>> To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
>
>> Subject: RE: [CR] Lubrication
>
>> Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2004 11:03:18 -0400
>
>>
>
>> I don't know if Campagnolo grease is any different from others, but
>> being
>
>> "period correct" with lubrication is important on practical rather than
>
>> asesthetic or "curatorial" reasons. Most pre 1960s bicycles, especially
>
>> British ones, were designed and built to be lubricated "little but
>> often".
>
>> There's nothing a British bike doesn't like, beyond an open road, than
>> oil
>
>> and the manuals all suggested lubricating every fortnight. It really is
>
>> essential to, as they charmingly suggested, to "ensure sweet running".
>
>> Pre-war, it was a common beginning of season ritual to repack hubs and
>
>> bottom brackets. I suspect more modern synthetic grease negates the need
>
>> for this. And Cyclo-Benelux derailleurs absolutely demand frequent
>> oiling
>
>> and cleaning.
>
>>
>
>> The other essential is gear oil for Sturmey-Archer hubs. This seems to
>> be a
>
>> bone of contention among some who believe you can inject any old motor
>> oil
>
>> into the hub and be done with it. Sturmey made, of course, their own
>> cycle
>
>> oil which was specially made for hub gears being non-gumming and highly
>
>> refined. That ended with Sun Race took over. But you can still get the
>> same
>
>> oil under the Raleigh name and also Halfords in the UK. It's essential
>> to
>
>> use this and not motor oil; a S/A gear is not a motor, it's a gear and
>> so
>
>> many gear problems arise from using too thick or gumming an oil. The
>
>> closest to S/A gear is sewing machine oil. I've seen S/A gears dating
>> from
>
>> the 1940s opened up and absolutely clean as a pin thanks to using the
>> right
>
>> lubricant whereas others look like the EXXON VALDEZ at low tide. A
>> simple
>
>> expediant to clean out an old gear is to flood it with WD40 first and
>> then
>
>> use proper gear oil.
>
>>
>
>> Peter Kohler
>
>> Washington DC USA
>
>>
>
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>
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>
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