[CR]RE - Jerry Moos remarks on "People's Car"


Example: Production Builders:Cinelli:Laser

From: "Amir Avitzur" <avitzur@013.net.il>
To: "jerrymoos" <jerrymoos@sbcglobal.net>, <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
References: <BAY1-F113fBsDjTAzcM00022d09@hotmail.com> <01ea01c44c91$eb23d720$efddfea9@mooshome>
Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2004 19:54:31 +0200
Subject: [CR]RE - Jerry Moos remarks on "People's Car"

Jerry Moos wrote:

"It seems the most prominent champion of affordable automobiles for the European masses was, sadly, Adolph Hitler, who ordered development of the Volkswagen, or "People's Car" as a way of solidifying his popularity with the German working class."

That's nonsense. Adolph Hitler used the VW as a way of syphoning money from the masses for his war effort. VW delivered very, very few cars "to the masses" before or during the WWII. VW "people's cars" first became popular under British and American occupation.

Amir Avitzur

Ramat-Gan, Israel


----- Original Message -----
From: "jerrymoos"
To: "sam Lingo" ; ;


<classicrendezvous@bikelist.org> Sent: Monday, June 07, 2004 3:18 PM Subject: Re: [CR]Peter Kohler's remarks onAmericanbikebuilder'squalitybeingajoke


> Early in the 20th century, two events occurred which reshaped American
> society and propelled the auto industry to the forefront of American
> industry. Henry Ford developed mass production techniques which made motor
> cars affordable for the average person, and huge oil fields were discovered
> in Texas, which would quickly led to cheap and plentiful gasoline for
> Henry's creations.
>
> But every great social change has its negative consequences, and the rapid
> rise of the American auto industry produced an equally rapid decline in the
> once prominent American bicycle industry. No person is more symbolic of
> this rapid transformation than Barney Oldfield, who most Americans know as
> the daring auto racer who piloted many of Henry Ford's racing prototypes,
> including the lengendary "999". What is now usually forgotten is that
> Oldfield had previously been equally famous as a prominent bicycle racer.
>
> I think the cycling culture survived in Europe because auto manufacturers
> there were slower to embrace mass production and the mass market. It seems
> the most prominent champion of affordable automobiles for the European
> masses was, sadly, Adolph Hitler, who ordered development of the Volkswagen,
> or "People's Car" as a way of solidifying his popularity with the German
> working class. No doubt the survival of cycling also owed a lot to the fact
> that Western Europe had no significant oil reserves (the technology to find
> oil at the bottom of the North Sea would not be developed unitil well after
> WWII). So gasoline in Europe was much more expensive than in America, and
> was made more so by the the heavy taxation of petroleum products by most
> European governments. So even if the working man could affort to purchase a
> car, the cost of fuel was a further barrier, and many continued to use
> bicycles as their primary transportation, which maintained a base of support
> for the cycling industry and sport cycling.
>
> Regards,
>
> Jerry Moos
> Houston, TX
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "sam Lingo" <samclingo@hotmail.com>
> To: <pariscyclesuk@hotmail.com>; <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
> Sent: Sunday, June 06, 2004 10:46 PM
> Subject: Re: [CR]Peter Kohler's remarks on
> Americanbikebuilder'squalitybeingajoke
>
>
> >
> > Gormully's did indeed have fancy lugs--I call that maker G&Js for
> short.They sold their bicycle line around 1903 to Pope when G&J started
> american motors corp.Pre 1900 American bikes were as good as could be found
> anyplace in the world.Dayton(huffy) built a cro-moly as early as 36 maybe
> earlier.By 1910 motors were our fancy,so bicycles took a big hit in the
> states till 1970
> >
> > sam lingo pleasanton tx
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > >From: "Mick Butler" <pariscyclesuk@hotmail.com>
> >
> > >To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
> >
> > >Subject: Re: [CR]Peter Kohler's remarks on American
> bikebuilder'squalitybeingajoke
> >
> > >Date: Sun, 06 Jun 2004 15:21:00 +0000
> >
> > >
> >
> > >
> >
> > >Hi all,
> >
> > >American bicycles are held in high esteem in the UK. Especially the
> >
> > >early makers such as Gormully & Jeffrey, Eagle, Overman, Pope,
> >
> > >Dayton, Iver Johnson, Ranger and those stunning Schwinn track irons.
> >
> > >Didn't Gormully's fit fancy lugs or lug extensions way back in
> >
> > >1900's on their Rambler?
> >
> > >
> >
> > >
> >
> > >Best wishes and be lucky. Michael Butler Huntingdon UK.