Re: [CR]Hirose on Japan bay


Example: Framebuilders:Mario Confente

Date: Wed, 30 Jun 2004 12:07:15 -0700
From: Kurt Sperry <haxixe@gmail.com>
To: "oroboyz@aol.com" <oroboyz@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [CR]Hirose on Japan bay
In-Reply-To: <1a1.265298a7.2e1465e6@aol.com>
References: <1a1.265298a7.2e1465e6@aol.com>
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

I don't think the gracefully curved fork blades universal on our on-topic bikes are examples of voodoo science at all as I've seen asserted. A straight bladed fork should tend to exhibit most of its elastic deformation near the crown where the bending moment is the greatest. In my intuitive opinion a curved fork should distribute the bending moment more evenly along the length of the fork blade allowing for more compliance all else being geometrically equal. Any engineers or fellow dilettantes care to weigh in?

Kurt Sperry Bellingham WA

On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 14:52:22 EDT, oroboyz@aol.com <oroboyz@aol.com> wrote:
> In a message dated 6/30/2004 2:25:50 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
> goodrichbikes@netzero.net writes:
>
> << Look at that fork rake. There must be a mile and a half
> of offset! The curve starts low and continues through to the drops. This
> is very attractive to me. >>
>
> What about that? I really, really like the look and the idea of soaking up
> some bumps but all the theories would say that it would ride like poo poo.
> What say you, gang?
>
> Dale Brown
> Greensboro, NC