Re: [CR]Japanese vs. Italian compatibility


Example: Events

Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2004 10:57:56 -0800
From: Chuck Schmidt <chuckschmidt@earthlink.net>
To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
Subject: Re: [CR]Japanese vs. Italian compatibility
References: <6.0.3.0.2.20040425074654.03895ff8@pop.mindspring.com> <049001c42c7b$278f0360$6501a8c0@lobby>


Tom Martin wrote:
>
> I'll put this one out there:
>
> Campag had just as many issues with compatibility 'back in the day'. There
> are all sorts of cryptic BB axle sizes to go with specific cranks and front
> derailluers. You either knew or didn't know, and being fluent in Italian,
> and have an understanding the nuances of Italian culture, and Italian Racing
> culture specifically to really make sense of what you were working with.
> That was a rather steep learning curve just to bolt on a gear changer or
> brake lever. They designed their rear derailluers to function best with
> certain freewheel cog combos, otherwise you would get poor shifting or no
> shifting at all. Campy shift levers wrapped the cable around the 'spool' a
> certain amount to accommodate different derailleurs.
> And what about the Campagnolo seatpost that required a special tool to
> access the hidden bolt under the saddle and on top of the post. That was a
> such a pain in the ass to access whether you had the special tool or not.

Back in the day (for me, mid-1970) you got a SR or NR bottom bracket, 68mm or 70mm with cups depending... no mystery about BB axle sizes. And the two bolt seat post? Never used the special wrench at all. Box end wrench, adjust the angle of the saddle and never have to touch the thing again! Freewheel cog combos? Regina six speed 12-21 or 12-17. Things were simple when your goal was to go fast.

BTW, Campagnolo issued a chart with all their BB cup and axle dimensions.

Chuck Schmidt South Pasadena, Southern California

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