Re: [CR]On reproduction parts


Example: Production Builders

Date: Wed, 09 Nov 2005 12:51:30 -0600
From: John Thompson <JohnThompson@new.rr.com>
Organization: The Crimson Permanent Assurance
To: classic list <Classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
Subject: Re: [CR]On reproduction parts
References: <7128919.1131551833843.JavaMail.root@mswamui-blood.atl.sa.earthlink.net>
In-Reply-To: <7128919.1131551833843.JavaMail.root@mswamui-blood.atl.sa.earthlink.net>


Nick Zatezalo wrote:
> Well to each his own.
>
> This from the archives via e-RICHIE
>
> http://search.bikelist.org/getmsg.asp?Filename=classicrendezvous.10405.0898.eml

I think there's a difference between a bike (or car) with some historic significance -- e.g. Merckx' one hour record bike as an extreme example -- and a bike being restored so it's identical to the one in the manufacturer's 1974 dealer catalog. If there is historic significance, then meter moves toward the period-correct original equipment restoration end of the dial. In extreme cases, perhaps a museum is a better place for some of these bikes. If you have a personal predilection for keeping things original, that's fine as well, but keep in mind that it is a *personal* thing. Not everybody will agree, and I'm sure most of us will compromise to some degree out of necessity, even if it means "next time I see a two-piece Campy BB sleeve, I'm buying it, and then I can remove the Sugino one that's been in there all these years that nobody else but me knows about."

My one bike with any degree of historic provenance -- the aforementioned 1980 Olympic team bike -- is doubtless incorrect in many ways. But these were sent out to the team as bare frames, and the teams built them up for each rider according to sponsor supplied equipment and rider preferences. The frame I have was a spare frame, not assigned to any particular rider. When I got it, it was bare except for Campy shift levers and a Super Record headset. I built it up with Super Record, because Campy was a sponsor, but the drillium chainrings are my own. I'm sure the team rides had their own little idiosyncrasies as well. My 1981 globe logo hoods died this summer and I replaced them with Modolo hoods, not being able to afford the real thing, and replicas not being available when I needed them. It's still a great bike, as far as I'm concerned.

In the end, I think there's room for all of us in this hobby: those who will settle for nothing less than period-correct, original equipment to impetuous Franken-bike riders who'll settle for anything that works, or at least comes close. And everything in between. :-)

--

-John Thompson (john@os2.dhs.org)
Appleton WI USA