Re: [CR]Upon my passing


From: "ternst" <ternst1@cox.net>
To: "kim klakow" <Akimbo71@gmx.net>
References: <000401c61218$95ec8a60$0200a8c0@D8XCLL51> <4022.1136480971@www88.gmx.net>
Subject: Re: [CR]Upon my passing
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 2006 12:08:04 -0800
reply-type=original
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

Nope: My Webster's New World Dictionary of The American Language: gantlet n. [ earlier gantlope < Sw. gatlopp, a running down a lane < gata, lane (akin to G. gasse: see gait) + lopp, a run akin to leap] 1. a) a former military punishment in which the offender had to run between two rows of men who struck him with clubs, etc. as he passed. -- run the gantlet 1. to be punished by means of the gantlet 2. to proceed while under attack from both sides, as by criticism, gossip, etc. As I remember, many American indian tribes also used the gantlet as a punishment and test of truth. Don't know whether the Indians or the military copied the other. That's another research. First I'm going to build another set of wood rims. These for a fellow collector's oulde Bianchi track bike. You need to check out Lederstrumpf and Karl May again, Jim. I suspect the original spelling is falling to the "au" common usage as many other words and expressions do in an evolving and living language. Ted Ernst Palos Verdes Estates, Ca


----- Original Message -----
From: "kim klakow"
To: "ternst"
Cc:
Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2006 9:09 AM
Subject: Re: [CR]Upon my passing



>> One runs the gantlet, one throws down the gauntlet. <
>
>
> Nope. It's both "gauntlet". I didn't even find "gantlet" in the
> dictionary;
> bike talk?
> In french it is "gantelet" or "gant" and this is a "rantelet" or "rant"
> ;-)
>
> kim
>
> --
> Kim Klakow
>
> Diplom Grafik Designer
> Akimbo71@gmx.net
> +49172-1786481
> Berlin - Germany
>
> Lust, ein paar Euro nebenbei zu verdienen? Ohne Kosten, ohne Risiko!
> Satte Provisionen für GMX Partner: http://www.gmx.net/de/go/partner