Re: [CR]was shorty fenders, now sign of "The Turkey"


Example: Framebuilders:Norman Taylor

Date: Tue, 16 May 2006 12:15:08 -0700 (PDT)
From: randy dugan <rsdugan@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [CR]was shorty fenders, now sign of "The Turkey"
To: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
In-Reply-To: <MONKEYFOODbrzvsTDWW000006f2@monkeyfood.nt.phred.org>
cc: dlr94306@yahoo.com

David,

The 'turkey' aspect comes in when someone rotates the bars of their standard ten-speed upward without changing the location or type of the brake levers... Now their hands are resting on the levers rather than the bars, so when the brakes are applied their body weight shifts forward, making it much harder to control braking. Plus the enevitable cable-routing problems...

Nothing 'turkey' about a properly thought-out and executed bar flipping tho.

Randy Dugan Former bike salesperson/mechanic that had to talk a lot of kids out of flipping their bars in the early '80s... Van Nuys, CA


>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Date: Tue, 16 May 2006 10:43:45 -0700 (PDT) From: David Ross <dlr94306@yahoo.com> Subject: Re: [CR]was shorty fenders, now sign of "The Turkey"

For some reason, "drop bars turned upside down" has become a defining mark of "The Turkey." Hard to imagine why, since it's a practice that goes back to at least the beginning of the 20th century. Haven't bars of all shapes and sizes been bolted up in every conceivable position if it serves a purpose? I've seen plenty of "bullhorn" bars that were really standard commuter-bike bars turned over.