Re: [CR]Re: solder, lead, etc


Example: Framebuilding:Tubing:Falck
From: <"brianbaylis@juno.com">
Date: Tue, 8 May 2007 16:53:23 GMT
To: losgatos_dale@yahoo.com
Subject: Re: [CR]Re: solder, lead, etc
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

Dale,

Solder is classified as alloys that melt at under 800 degrees F. It

becomes brazing material above that temp. Lead for old cars is

probably solder just like other low temp alloys. Alloys are created

for specific purposes; the skill is choosing which alloy works best

for the application at hand. There are thousands of types of solder,

many with the same melting point, but having quite different

charactistics, and therefore different uses. Choose wisely.

Brian Baylis
La Mesa, CA


-- "Dale B. Phelps" wrote:


Does anyone use 100% lead-free solder? IS there such a thing?

I know that solder with relatively higher % of tin has a lower

melting point than solders with more lead in them, but in my business

(space/aerospace) there's a movement to get away from tin because of

certain funny properties it has over time.

We used to use lead sticks (70-80% lead) as a filler on cars, some

guys still do, especially on "real" classics (read: 7 or 8- figure "golden age" handbuilts.)

I guess I am wondering when "lead" becomes "solder" in the frame- builder's lexicon, or if I should be wondering more about when the

nubbly campy shifters were smoothed out -smile-

Dale "got a dent that needs repair but not filling" Phelps Montagna lunga Colorado

Dale B. Phelps

303.651.7307

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