[CR]Another side bar on the original/restoration thread


From: "Tom Sanders" <tsan7759142@sbcglobal.net>
To: <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
Date: Sun, 3 Jun 2007 12:37:46 -0400
Thread-Index: Acel/YPLYaFl0PJxRl69Ox6r9diHhw==
Subject: [CR]Another side bar on the original/restoration thread

Gilbert Anderson wisely pointed to a definition of Patina as a surface that has weathered inside and thus remained largely intact. Such surfaces on furniture are often a mix of wax, dirt, cigarette or other smoke, more dirt, etc. I had the luxury of discussing this with Margaret Merrill, one of the top experts in the field of New England Antiques (Her son Dick is probably still the most famous auctioneer of such things) many years ago and asked about cleaning an object. Her reply was a tart "Why I hardly think it would have been used dirty!" Of course hers is not the only thought on the matter. Now what about finishes that were not protected by an interior environment? Cigar Store Indians were routinely exposed to the elements...they were routinely repainted every few years (their feet rotted off, too)...a finish that did not have several layers beneath it would be a point to arouse one's caution in the buying of one. Bikes obviously are ridden on the road. Stones, dirt, rain, even snow and hail (well maybe not hail) and the random accidental contact with other objects were often showered upon them. If their surface is ruined by years of hard usage, are they to be considered inferior? Some cherish this very aspect of them. Obviously most would rather have a nice original finish...some would covet a new in the box ware house find kind of finish... None of these folks are wrong...only opiniated differently. We sometimes in our zeal want to assign a "wrong" or "right" to such opinions. If you must...so be it. However I think it is a bit presumptuous, and degrading to folks who do not share your opinion, if you do. Frankly, aside some consideration of resale value, if it's my bike I will do with it as I please and I think consideration of such a viewpoint should be paramount in a discussion among friends.
Tom Sanders
Lansing, Mi USA