RE: [CR]Removing Annodized Finish

(Example: Production Builders:Teledyne)

From: <"kyle-chrisbrooks@earthlink.net">
To: "Jerome & Elizabeth Moos" <jerrymoos@sbcglobal.net>, loudeeter@aol.com, classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
Subject: RE: [CR]Removing Annodized Finish
Date: Tue, 10 Jul 2007 14:13:27 -0400


Ray Dobbins has some info on this at his website. Here is what he says about removing anodizing so you can polish aluminum parts:

"If your part is anodized, you must remove the anodizing before you can polish the part. I remove it with Easy-Off oven cleaner spray (the heavy-duty one, not the new no-odor one), which has lye as its main ingredient. Use regular dishwasing gloves (not just latex or thin vinyl because the lye will eat right through them), and work outdoors because the fumes are very powerful (they will knock you back!). I place the part in a plastic container and then I spray the Easy-Off liberally over the part. I let it sit for no more than 3-5 minutes (otherwise the lye may start to eat away at the aluminum and cause pitting). Then I scrub it real well with super fine steel wool (#0000 grade) to make sure I get all the anodizing off. Then I wash the part with Simple-Green, rinse it thoroughly with warm water and dry it off. This whole process will leave the aluminum very dull, but that's OK (don't freak out), because it'll shine right up once you start polishing."

You can read more, and see the results on Ray's page at: http://www.raydobbins.com/ -- He has some great photos on his site.

I've also heard of people mixing a mild lye solution to soak the parts (dry Drano + water), but the Easy Off method sounds a little easier and safer.

By the way, I would NOT recommend spraying the parts with Easy Off and then putting them in the oven! If I'm not mistaken, you could have a risk of fire or explosion from combining the fumes with the heat of the oven. In fact, while I don't have a can of the stuff handy so I can verify this, but I'm almost certain that there is a warning on the can about using Easy-Off in a hot oven, or turning the oven on after spraying it inside. The reaction between lye and aluminum works at room temperature, and as far as I know, does not need extra heat to improve the results.

Kyle Brooks Akron, OH


> [Original Message]
> From: Jerome & Elizabeth Moos <jerrymoos@sbcglobal.net>
> To: <loudeeter@aol.com>; <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
> Date: 7/10/2007 10:23:24 AM
> Subject: [CR]Removing Annodized Finish
>
> I have a couple of Blackburn racks anodized black. Never liked the black as well as silver, partly because small scratches are more evident on the black racks. Anyone know a way of removing the black anodized finish, other than sanding it off? If not, anyone had good results respraying these black with spraycan paint to cover the scratches?
>
> Regards,
>
> Jerry Moos
> Big Spring, TX