Re: [CR] Campagnolo Crank Crack -- Should I be worried?

(Example: Framebuilding)

From: "Greg Thies" <gthies1@cox.net>
To: <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2009 16:03:57 -0500
In-Reply-To: <mailman.9.1232395221.3551.classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
Subject: Re: [CR] Campagnolo Crank Crack -- Should I be worried?


Several years ago I built up a previously unbuilt 1976 Eisentraut Custom A frame with all NOS Campy SR components. Before the crank was installed, the edges were filed to help ensure it would not deteriorate at this well known weak point. I would not hesitate to purchase an altered crank either. This kind of decision falls neatly under the "brains before beauty" maxim. The only reason to not "fix" these beautiful cranks is if the bike is never going to be ridden. But owning wall hangers isn't as much fun!

Greg Thies Vienna, Virginia

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Message: 12 Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2009 14:53:31 -0500 From: Harry Travis <travis.harry@gmail.com> Subject: Re: [CR] Campagnolo Crank Crack -- Should I be worried? To: <passionateyouththing@yahoo.com> Cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org Message-ID: <58dbc8400901191153u2bdd035dhcc65e63c0c50bb56@mail.gmail.com> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"

Search for (engineer) "jobst" in rec.tech or on the late Sheldon Brown's pages for analysis of stress risers.

Jobst broke more than one during his long alpine cycling career.

Would engineers here comment on how thorough the polishing of the sharp-edged web should be to keep these stress fractures from occuring, if it can be prevented at all?

Would collectors comment on whether they would buy or spurn a Campagnolo spider whose sharp edge was finished by a previous owner this way?

Harry Travis
Washington, DC
USA