Re: [CR] Soaking saddles


Example: History:Norris Lockley

In-Reply-To: <8CBAEFCF1093613-C8C-2248@webmail-me17.sysops.aol.com>
References: <9103102d0905281026y3415d8a4k46b0205046e04f61@mail.gmail.com> <8CBADD86417BD24-BB0-A3B@WEBMAIL-MC15.sysops.aol.com>
Date: Sat, 30 May 2009 01:33:20 -0600
From: mitch harris <mitch.harris531@gmail.com>
To: <bikefll57@aol.com>
Cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
Subject: Re: [CR] Soaking saddles


On Fri, May 29, 2009 at 11:16 PM, <bikefll57@aol.com> wrote:
> For all it's worth, my father used to break in his new leather hiking boots (back in the 60's and 70's) by soaking them in water, then wearing them day in and day out with several thin pairs of socks to reduce friction. I wonder if there is an equivalent here in breaking in saddles. If there's a tension adjustment, would it help to start looser or tighter?
>
> just wondering...
>

Peter Limmer's site mentions this as advice GIs used to get for breaking in their combat boots. The idea was that the wetness was supposed to allow the leather to cling to and mold to the feet. Limmer doesn't recommend this but is open minded about using damp socks for this. There doesn't seem, to me, to be much comparison to saddles since they are used in high tension like a hammock unlike the boots. Sitting on and stretching that soggy saddle is what in my experience has turned a Brooks into the proverbial "ass hatchet" with a high ridge down the middle, or has made the side flaps curl out straight to the side. I'm guessing that a certain proportion of the clapped out Brooks saddles that we're all considering restoring by soaking are in this terrible shape for having been ridden wet. Just a guess.

--Mitch Harris
Little Rock Canyon, Utah, USA


> Paul Andrews

> Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA

>

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: cwstudio@aol.com

> To: jgabus@gmail.com; classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

> Sent: Thu, 28 May 2009 2:22 pm

> Subject: Re: [CR] Soaking saddles

>

>

>

> Interesting discussion, and it all makes sense.

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> However, I have a Brooks Professional with a slightly different issue.

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> The saddle is circa 1980, and looks almost new. It was on a bike that was barely

> ridden when new in 1980, then stored until last year. The saddle was apparently

> never fully broken in.?

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> The saddle is rock hard. I've given it a couple of thorough rub downs with

> Proofhide and ridden it many miles, yet it is still hard.?

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> I'm very curious whether the soaking technique might work it's magic on this

> saddle, and I welcome input from the soakers among us.?

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> It's a beautiful saddle and I would love to break it in properly.

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> Thanks,

>

> Chris Wimpey

>

> San Diego, California

>

> USA

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>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: Jack Gabus <jgabus@gmail.com>

> To: CR <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>

> Sent: Thu, 28 May 2009 10:26 am

> Subject: [CR] Soaking saddles

>

>

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>

> I love this discussion because the best fitting saddle I have is my Brooks

> Swift on my Seven.  The reason is the second time I rode on it, I got caught

> in a horrific thunder storm in Iowa (RAGBRAI). That morning it rained cats

> and dogs and then in the after noon it was a beautiful sunny day, 90 miles

> later it took the shape of my,  well let say my large back side.  To my

> surprise the next day it fit like a million bucks, I have never messed with

> it since.  Water works for me.

>

> Cheers,

>

> Jack

>

> --

> Jack Gabus

> 310 490 3784

> jgabus@gmail.com

> Laguna

>  Beach, CA

> USA