Re: [CR]Early parallelogram derailleurs: Campy wins, sort of.


Example: Framebuilding:Restoration

Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 20:24:09 +0100
Subject: Re: [CR]Early parallelogram derailleurs: Campy wins, sort of.
From: Hilary Stone <hilary.stone@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: Jerome & Elizabeth Moos <jerrymoos@sbcglobal.net>, HM & SS Sachs <sachs@erols.com>, Classic Rendezvous <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
In-Reply-To: <20041010184630.39706.qmail@web81010.mail.yahoo.com>


Simplex introduced parallelogram derailleurs in 1960. Huret introduced the Allvit in 1958/9 and Cyclo Benelux (England), the Super 60 in 1960. I think SunTour introduced their first parallelogram derailleur in 1964. Huret, Simplex and Cyclo all continued with plunger type rear derailleurs until 1962 or so. The next issue of V-CC's The Boneshaker contains a seminal article on Cyclo England and its derailleurs, not written by me, I wish to add. It looks like its running to 24 pages. Another good reason for joining the V-CC...

Hilary Stone, Bristol, England

Jerry Moos wrote:
>
> Speaking of "plunger" type RD's, these seem to have survived well beyond the
> introduction of the Campy parallelogram Grand Sport. What was the first
> Simplex parallelogram RD? What about Huret? Did these companies continue
> making plunger types after introducing parallelogram models? Cyclo (Benelux)
> seems to have continued with a plunger type well into the 60's, maybe even
> into the very early 70's. Did Cyclo ever produce a parallelogram RD? This
> whole subject would seem worthy of a Design Classics column, or perhaps
> several.
>
>
> Hilary Stone <hilary.stone@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
> This is not really true - the Simplex plunger gears shifted far better than
> the Campagnolo Gran Sport with a quick change with almost no overshifting
> required. This was in large part due to the sprung upper pivot which kept
> the upper pulley close to the freewheel. Other plunger type gears did not
> work as well.
> The Gran Sport was more robust and easier to fit but shifted very poorly
> especially if the difference in size between the chainrings was more than a
> few teeth.
>
> Hilary Stone, Bristol, England
>
> Harvey Sachs wrote:
>>
>> So, by and large, it seems fair to conclude that the Campy GS, 1951, was
>> the first successful parallogram rear derailleur from a firm big enough
>> to market it.
>>
>> And it was one heck of a lot better than the plunger units it competed
>> against.