RE: [CR]Rite of passage #2


From: "Roman Stankus" <rstankus@mindspring.com>
To: "'James Swan'" <jswan@optonline.net>, "'Donald Gillies'" <gillies@cs.ubc.ca>
Subject: RE: [CR]Rite of passage #2
Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2007 07:24:57 -0400
In-Reply-To: <A3E7F64E-A4BB-4231-A623-11AA7BCAD139@optonline.net>
Thread-Index: Ace9XKebEWGhjfZrQV6sxRVTDveatAABVoIg
cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org

Jamie,

At Cirque this year - I manged that bonehead move and it was a scare. A few of us had gone out on Friday AM for a ride and on the way back in on Church street, there was a lot of fresh tar/pebbles from road work going on that kept getting on the tires and making for a bumpy ride. I usually keep my hand clear of that area, but for whatever reason, I reached back there to clean off the rear tire and managed to get my hand caught in that spot for a moment, locked up the rear wheel, but got my hand out very quickly and did "a little dance" without going down. I'll try to never repeat that little episode!

Jamie, thanks for the tip!

Roman Stankus Atlanta, Ga. USA
> -----Original Message-----
> From: classicrendezvous-bounces@bikelist.org
> [mailto:classicrendezvous-bounces@bikelist.org] On Behalf Of
> James Swan
> Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 6:26 AM
> To: Donald Gillies
> Cc: classicrendezvous@bikelist.org
> Subject: Re: [CR]Rite of passage #2
>
> OK here is another variation on that theme and it happens fairly
> regularly:
>
> Rider attempts to glove rear tire and gets hand stuck between
> tire surface and back of seat tube. The surface of the tire
> is sucking the rider's hand into the narrow V between the
> wheel and the seat tube.
> It is pretty difficult to yank one's hand out. Of course this
> also locks the rear wheel. One would think that is might be a
> controllable situation but I've never seen anybody ride it
> out. I guess thats because they didn't see it coming.
>
> The way to prevent this is to always reach around behind your
> leg, not between your legs. Fixed gear riders pretty much
> have no choice but to do it the right way. Lots of guys catch
> the brake bridge with their thumb as a way to keep their hand
> out of that evil spot.
>
> I still see guys doing it the wrong way all the time.
>
>
> Jamie Swan
> Centerport Cycles Inc.
> 245 Main St.
> Northport, N.Y., U.S.A. 11768
> 631-262-0909
>
> http://www.centerportcycles.com (mapped)
> http://www.cabinfeverauctions.com
> http://www.limws.org
> http://www.liatca.org
>
>
>
> On Jul 3, 2007, at 12:39 AM, Donald Gillies wrote:
>
> > ok, i cannot believe i'm admitting it, but here it is :
> >
> > coming home from college one day, i rode my SEKAI 2500
> through a pile
> > of broken glass. Like an experienced italian road racer, i reached
> > down with my gloved hand to wipe the glass from my front
> tire... but
> > what...??? Buon Signore!
> >
> > My hand was not gloved, so i decided to use my shoe and stick it
> > against the tire, behind the fork. My resulting 360 over the
> > handlebars scared the pizza man (looking out the window at me) more
> > than it scared me, at 5mph. I landed on my backpack without even
> > touching my helmet (at usual, in 33 years of riding and after
> > countless accidents, my helmet has NEVER gotten hit ...) Even the
> > fork was unscathed! Still, don't try this at home ...
> >
> > - Don Gillies
> > San Diego, CA, USA